Migraine – Interview with Dr. Mukesh Batra

Migraine – Interview with Dr. Mukesh Batra
Homeopathy

In an interview with Dr Mukesh Batra, Founder & Chairman, Dr Batra's Group of Companies regarding the Migraine problem which many people faces, here is how our doctor suggests the homeopath way of treating the same.  1. How do you know if you're suffering from a migraine? What makes a migraine different than a tension headache?

Migraine headache presents with pulsating pain on one side of the head. It usually lasts for 4 to 72 hours. A dark, quiet room is what most migraine sufferers seek to manage pain. Nausea, light-sensitivity and visual aura (déjà vu) are common with migraines.

Tension headache presents with a vice-like twinge felt on both sides of the head. It is more frequent, but milder than other types of headaches. It develops over several hours and is often worse at dusk.

2. What are the natural treatments for headache?

Homeopathy. Homeopathy aims to treat the individual that carries the migraine ‘burden’ on his/her head, rather than the problem per se. Remember, no two individuals with migraine display the same set of symptoms, peculiarities, sensitivities, or temperament. Homeopathy elicits and treats these special characteristics, from the back-to-front, looking at the possible causes or triggers.

Homeopathy evidences that a certain medicine that can cause migraine-like symptoms can also treat individuals having migraine, exhibiting the same, unique set of symptoms. However, what distinguishes homeopathy from other systems is no two individuals with migraine may be prescribed the same medicine. Rather, the appropriate medicine takes its cue from each individual’s distinguishing symptoms. One individual with migraine, for example, may feel better with a hankie tied around the head; while another may feel worse. This calls for the use of two different homeopathic remedies.

In a randomised, placebo (dummy pill)-controlled double-blind study, to cull just one example, a group of people suffering from migraine were treated using constitutional homoeopathy over a period of four months. Those patients in the control group experienced a reduction in migraine frequency from 9.9 attacks per month to 7.9 per month, while those in the homeopathic treatment group reduced their monthly migraine attack rate from 10 to between 1.8 and 3 per month.

3. What are the simple options available for migraine headache?

Muscle relaxation exercises. Relaxation may help ease the pain of migraine headaches. Relaxation techniques may include progressive muscle relaxation, meditation or yoga.

Get enough sleep, but don't oversleep. Get an adequate amount of sleep each night. It's best to go to bed and wake up at regular times.

Rest and relax. If possible, rest in a dark, quiet room when you feel a headache coming on. Place an ice pack wrapped in a cloth on the back of your neck and apply gentle pressure to painful areas on your scalp.

Keep a headache diary. Continue keeping your headache diary even after you see your doctor. It will help you learn more about what triggers your migraines and what treatment is most suitable or effective.

Take a magnesium supplement. Research suggests a likely relationship between migraine and magnesium deficiency.

4. What triggers headache?

What actually causes migraine is not yet known, notwithstanding scientific advance. It is suggested that it may result from a blend of factors — blood vessel enlargement and release of certain chemicals from nerve fibres. Once this happens, the nerve fibres ‘curl’ around blood vessels. This may lead to swelling of the blood vessels just under the skin of the temple.

The following sequel is, thereafter, a lurking prospect: headache, feelings of nausea, diarrhoea and/or vomiting.

During a migraine episode, there may also be delayed emptying of the stomach into the small intestine. This may affect absorption of food and blood circulation. It also increases one’s sensitivity to light and noise (sound).

Migraine is a complex syndrome. It affects millions of people worldwide. What distinguishes the disorder, from other types of headaches, is periodic or episodic ache, or pain.

Migraine usually affects people in their mid-twenties, or 30s. Interestingly, it is also common in children. Have you not heard parents complaining that their child has had ‘migraine-type’ of headaches for as long as they know?

5. Is there any connection between the diet and headache?

There is. Headaches are as common as the common cold. Causes include food allergies, environmental allergies, stress, nutritional deficiencies and muscular tension. Headaches can, at times, be a symptom of serious illnesses too. It is, therefore, important to rule out major triggers — meningitis, brain tumour, haemorrhage, and dangerously-high blood pressure.

6. Is there any relation between migraine and menopause in women?

You may find that your migraine attacks are linked to your periods during peri-menopause. This is probably because the ovaries produce less oestrogen; also changes in your hormonal levels can make your migraine attacks more severe or occur more often. Studies conducted suggest that menopause makes migraine worse for up to 45 per cent of women, albeit 30-45 per cent do not notice a difference, and 15 per cent notice improvement. It is also evidenced that some women find their migraine attacks follow a cyclical pattern, even years after the menopause. The medical reason for this is imprecise.

7. What are the different types of migraines?

Migraine with aura, or classic migraine
Migraine without aura, or common migraine
An “aura” is a physiological warning sign that a migraine is about to begin.
Hemiplegic migraine. The onset of the headache may be associated with temporary numbness, dizziness, or vision changes. It must be differentiated from a stroke
Retinal migraine. Temporary, partial, or complete loss of vision in one eye, along with a dull ache.
Basilar artery migraine. Dizziness, confusion, or loss of balance can precede the headache, which is usually caused by hormonal factors or changes.
Status migrainosus. A rare and severe type of migraine that can last 72 hours, or longer. The pain and nausea are so powerful that the individual may need hospital admission
Ophthalmoplegic migraine. This is an emergency medical condition, as symptoms may be caused by pressure on the nerves behind the eye, or an aneurysm.

8. Do hereditary factors play an important role in migraine?

Yes, migraines can be hereditary. Four out of five migraine sufferers often have a family history of migraines. If one parent has a history of migraines, the child has a 50 per cent chance of developing migraines; if both parents have a history, the risk amplifies by 75 per cent.

9. Is there a chance to get rid of migraine forever?

Conventional medicines offer only short-term relief from migraine; the relief is not long-lasting. Add to this side-effects, and one may sometimes feel that these medicines are, perforce, be worse than the disorder.

From the therapeutic viewpoint, homoeopathy provides the best possible long-term solution for migraine. It presents through its medicinal armamentarium a comprehensive, safe, and effective treatment for a vast majority of migraine ‘victims.’

Homeopathy aims to treat the individual that carries the migraine ‘burden’ on his/her head, rather than the problem per se. Remember, no two individuals with migraine display the same set of symptoms, peculiarities, sensitivities, or temperament. Homeopathy elicits and treats these special characteristics, from the back-to-front, looking at the possible causes or triggers.

Homeopathy evidences that a certain homeopathic medicine that can cause migraine-like symptoms can also treat individuals having migraine, and exhibiting the same, unique set of symptoms. However, what distinguishes homeopathy from other systems is no two individuals with migraine may be prescribed the same medicine. Rather, the appropriate medicine takes its cue from the portrait of each individual’s distinguishing symptoms. One individual with migraine, for example, may feel better with a hankie tied around the head; while another may feel worse. This calls for the use of two different homeopathic remedies.

10. What are the measures taken to prevent headache?

• Get adequate sleep for 6-8 hours every day. Studies have shown that people who sleep well are better equipped to prevent headaches and migraine attacks
• Eat regular meals; skipping meals or irregular snacking can trigger headaches
• Exercise regularly; exercises and relaxation techniques, such as yoga, go a long way in easing headaches/migraine
• Avoid foods that may trigger migraine attacks — like old cheese, alcohol, chocolate, yeast, stale meats, monosodium glutamate (MSG), red wine, soybean and coffee.

11. Is there anything else which you would like to share?

Migraine rules the head like a dictator. Symptoms include intense attacks of periodic headaches, preceded by visual disturbances, blind spots, tingling in the arms and legs, followed by sleepiness.,

Migraine pains may, of course, differ in their nature, frequency and duration, but they all make the affected individual literally pray for relief.

There may be a genetic element too, although migraine is more common in women, right from the teenage years and motherhood to menopause.

It also tends to affect people who strive for perfection in everything they do.

A migraine headache may start suddenly. It may also be gradual; this generally affects the unsuspecting individual in the wee hours of the morning. It may also have a tendency to ruin one’s weekends. This is quite sickening, although it may not interfere with one’s work/occupation, unless one is working during weekends. Any which way you look at it, migraine often robs its ‘victims’ of the pleasures of relaxation, a holiday or vacation.

Special Thanks To:

Dr. Mukesh Batra

Dr. Mukesh Batra


Dr Mukesh Batra
Founder & Chairman
Dr Batra's Group of Companies
Website: www.drbatras.com
Toll Free No : 1800 209 2040

Digital Marketer, Mumpreneur, Blogger and Business Coach.

About Rachna Gupta

Digital Marketer, Mumpreneur, Blogger and Business Coach.